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Posted on 1/29/2019

12 Historical Sites in Cades Cove You Must See


If you're a traveller looking for an interesting and historically significant destination to explore, look no further than Cades Cove in the Great Smoky Mountains. This beautiful area is home to twelve unique historical sites that are definitely worth checking out. So pack your bags and get ready for an adventure!

1. THE JOHN OLIVER CABIN

The Oliver Cabin is one of the most iconic structures in Cades Cove. It was constructed between 1822-1823 by the cove's first permanent European settlers, the Olivers. Dunn reports that the Olivers spent the winter of 1818-1819 in an abandoned Cherokee hut, and built a crude structure the following year. The Oliver Cabin was built as a replacement for this first crude structure, which was located a few yards behind the cabin. Today, the Oliver Cabin is one of the best-preserved historic structures in Cades Cove. It is a popular stop on the Cades Cove loop road, and it offers visitors a glimpse into what life was like for early settlers in the Great Smoky Mountains.

2. THE PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH

Cades Cove Baptist Church is a historic church located in Cades Cove, Tennessee. The church was constructed in 1887 and was originally named the Cades Cove Baptist Church. In 1841, the church was renamed "Primitive Baptist" after the Anti-Missions Split. The Oliver's and Russell Gregory are buried in the church's cemetery. The Cades Cove Baptist Church is a beautiful example of early American architecture and is well worth a visit if you're ever in Cades Cove.

3. THE CADES COVE METHODIST CHURCH

Cades Cove is a beautiful valley that is nestled in the Great Smoky Mountains of Tennessee. It is home to many historic buildings, including the Cades Cove Methodist Church. The church was constructed in 1902, but Methodists were active in the cove as early as the 1820s. They built their first meeting house in 1840. The Cades Cove Methodist Church is a beautiful example of vernacular architecture. It is a simple one-story frame building with a gabled roof and a front porch. The church is open to the public and is well worth a visit.

4. THE CADES COVE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH

One of the most interesting places in Cades Cove is the Cades Cove Missionary Baptist Church. The current building was constructed between 1915 and 1916, but the church itself was formed much earlier. In 1839, a small group of Cades Cove Baptists broke away from the main church due to a disagreement over missions. The Cades Cove Baptists didn't believe that missions were authorized by scripture, so they decided to form their own church.

5. THE MYERS BARN

Constructed in 1920, the Myers Barn is a more modern-looking hay barn located along the trail to the Elijah Oliver Place. The barn was built by C. C. Myers, who purchased the land in 1919. C. C. Myers was a cattleman from Sevier County and operated a large dairy farm in Cades Cove. The barn is a two-story structure with a gabled roof and metal siding. The first floor of the barn was used for storing hay and feed, while the second floor served as a loft for storing hay bales. The barn has a cupola on the roof, which provided ventilation for the hay storage area. Today, the Myers Barn is one of the most photographed buildings in Cades Cove and is an important part of the history of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

6. THE ELIJAH OLIVER PLACE

The Elijah Oliver Place is a historic farmhouse in Cades Cove, Tennessee. Constructed in 1866, it is one of the oldest surviving structures in the Cades Cove area. The house was built by Elijah Oliver, who was the son of John and Lucretia Oliver. His original farm was destroyed during the U.S. Civil War by Confederate marauders. After the war, Elijah rebuilt his farm and constructed this house. The Elijah Oliver Place is now a popular tourist destination, and it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Visitors to the Cades Cove area can tour the house and learn about its history.

7. THE JOHN CABLE GRIST MILL

The John Cable Grist Mill is a historic grist mill located in Cades Cove, Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The mill was built in 1868 by John P. Cable, a nephew of Peter Cable. The mill is a two-story log structure with a gable roof and granite foundation. The mill's overshot water wheel is powered by water from Mill Creek and Forge Creek. The mill operated until 1934 when it was abandoned due to the construction of the Fontana Dam. The mill was restored in 1966 and is now open to the public.

8. THE BECKY CABLE HOUSE

The Becky Cable House is one of the many historic buildings in Cades Cove. The house was constructed in 1879 and was originally used as a general store by Leason Gregg. In 1887, Gregg sold the house to John Cable's spinster daughter, Rebecca Cable. A Cable family tradition says that Rebecca never forgave her father and refused to marry after her father broke off one of her childhood romances. Various buildings have been moved from elsewhere in the cove and placed near the Cable mill, including a barn, a carriage house, a chicken coop, a molasses still, a sorghum press, and a replica of a blacksmith shop. The Becky Cable House is just one of the many interesting and historic buildings in Cades Cove.

9. THE HENRY WHITEHEAD CABIN

The Henry Whitehead Cabin is located on Forge Creek Road near Chestnut Flats in Cades Cove. It was built by Matilda "Aunt Tildy" Shields and her second husband, Henry Whitehead, between 1895 and 1896. Aunt Tildy's sons from her first marriage were prominent figures in the cove's moonshine trade. The cabin is a one-story log structure with a front porch. Inside, there is a large central room with a fireplace and two smaller rooms. The cabin is now open to the public and is furnished with period furniture. Visitors can step back in time and imagine what life was like for the early settlers of Cades Cove.

10. THE DAN LAWSON PLACE

The Cove is home to a number of historic buildings, including the Dan Lawson Place. Built by Peter Cable in the 1840s, the Lawson Place was acquired by Dan Lawson after he married Cable's daughter, Mary Jane. Lawson was a wealthy man, and the homestead includes a cabin (still called the Peter Cable cabin), a smokehouse, a chicken coop, and a hay barn. Today, visitors can tour the homestead and learn about the history of Cades Cove.

11. THE TIPTON PLACE

The Tipton Place is a historic homestead in Cades Cove, Tennessee. The property includes a log cabin, a double-cantilever barn, and several outbuildings. The cabin was built in the 1880s by the descendants of Revolutionary War veteran William "Fighting Billy" Tipton. The paneling on the house was a later addition. The Tipton family lived on the homestead for several generations, and it is now managed by the National Park Service. Visitors to Cades Cove can tour the Tipton Place and learn about the history of the Cades Cove community.

12. THE CARTER SHIELDS CABIN

Cades Cove is a beautiful valley nestled in the Great Smoky Mountains of Tennessee. It is home to many iconic log cabin buildings, including the Carter Shields Cabin. The cabin was built in the 1880s by Carter Shields, an early settler of Cades Cove. It is one of the oldest surviving structures in the valley. The cabin is built of logs hewn from trees in the surrounding forest. It has a simple design with a single room and a loft. The cabin was used as a home and a storehouse for farm equipment. Today, it is a popular tourist destination and a reminder of Cades Cove's rich history.
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